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Norman Culture and Society: Language, Law, Religion, and Art


- Norman conquest of England - Norman impact on culture and society H2: What was life like in Norman times? - Feudal system and social classes - Castles and fortifications - Religion and education H2: How did the Normans change England? - Language and literature - Law and government - Architecture and art H2: How can you learn more about the Normans? - Online resources and websites - Books and documentaries - Museums and historical sites H1: Conclusion Summary and main points H1: FAQs - Who was the leader of the Normans? - When did the Norman conquest end? - What was the most famous battle of the Norman conquest? - What was the Domesday Book? - What are some examples of Norman words in English? Table 2: Article with HTML formatting Primary Homework Normans: A Guide for Students




If you are studying history at school, you might have heard of the Normans. They were a group of people who invaded England in 1066 and changed the country in many ways. But who were they, where did they come from, and what did they do? In this article, we will answer these questions and more. We will also give you some tips on how to learn more about the Normans and their legacy.




Primary Homework Normans



Who were the Normans?




The Normans were descendants of Vikings who settled in northern France in the 10th century. They became known as Normans, which means "northmen" in French. They adopted the French language, culture, and Christianity, but they also kept some of their Viking traits, such as being fierce warriors and skilled sailors.


Norman conquest of England




In 1066, the king of England, Edward the Confessor, died without a clear heir. Several claimants competed for the throne, including Harold Godwinson, the powerful earl of Wessex, and William, the duke of Normandy. William claimed that Edward had promised him the crown before he died, and that Harold had sworn to support him. However, Harold was crowned king by the English nobles shortly after Edward's death.


William was not happy with this situation. He decided to invade England and claim the throne by force. He gathered a large army of Normans and other allies from France and sailed across the English Channel. He landed at Pevensey in Sussex on September 28th, 1066. Harold marched south with his army to meet him.


The two armies clashed at the Battle of Hastings on October 14th, 1066. It was a bloody and fierce battle that lasted all day. The Normans had an advantage over the English because they had cavalry (soldiers on horses) and archers (soldiers with bows and arrows), while the English mainly fought on foot with axes and spears. The turning point of the battle came when Harold was killed by an arrow that hit his eye. The English army lost its leader and morale, and soon collapsed. William won the battle and became known as William the Conqueror.


Norman impact on culture and society




The Norman conquest was not just a military event. It also had a huge impact on the culture and society of England. The Normans brought with them their own language, laws, customs, art, architecture, religion, and way of life. They replaced most of the English nobles with their own followers, who became lords of lands and castles. They also imposed heavy taxes and harsh punishments on the English people, who often resisted and rebelled against them.


The Normans also influenced the development of the English language. They introduced many words from French into English, especially related to government, law, religion, food, fashion, and culture. For example, words like parliament, justice, church, beef, dress, and music are all derived from French. The Normans also changed the spelling and pronunciation of some English words, such as adding silent letters like "k" in knight and "gh" in night.


What was life like in Norman times?




Life in Norman times was very different from life today. People lived in a feudal system, which was a way of organizing society based on land and loyalty. People also lived in different types of buildings, depending on their social class and location. They also had different beliefs and practices regarding religion and education.


Feudal system and social classes




The feudal system was a hierarchy of people who owed service and loyalty to each other. At the top of the hierarchy was the king, who owned all the land in the country. He granted parts of his land to his nobles, who were called barons. The barons swore to serve and protect the king, and to provide him with soldiers and money when needed. The barons also granted parts of their land to their followers, who were called knights. The knights swore to serve and protect the barons, and to fight for them in wars. The knights also granted parts of their land to their workers, who were called peasants. The peasants swore to serve and work for the knights, and to pay them rent and taxes. The peasants had the lowest status in society and had very few rights or freedoms.


The feudal system created a clear division between the social classes in Norman times. The nobles and the knights were rich and powerful, while the peasants were poor and oppressed. The nobles and the knights lived in castles and manors, while the peasants lived in villages and farms. The nobles and the knights wore fine clothes and ate well, while the peasants wore simple clothes and ate poorly. The nobles and the knights enjoyed leisure activities like hunting, hawking, chess, and music, while the peasants worked hard from dawn to dusk.


Castles and fortifications




One of the most noticeable features of Norman times was the building of castles and fortifications. The Normans built these structures to defend themselves from enemies and to control the land they conquered. They also used them as residences, administrative centers, courts, prisons, and symbols of power.


A typical Norman castle consisted of a motte (a large mound of earth) with a wooden or stone tower on top, called a keep. The keep was surrounded by a bailey (a courtyard) with a wooden or stone wall around it. The wall had towers, gates, and a ditch or moat filled with water for extra protection. Some castles also had additional walls or rings around them, called concentric castles.


Some of the most famous Norman castles in England include the Tower of London, Windsor Castle, Warwick Castle, Durham Castle, Rochester Castle, and Dover Castle.


Religion and education




Religion was very important in Norman times. Most people were Christians who belonged to the Roman Catholic Church. The church had a lot of influence over people's lives, beliefs, morals, laws, politics, art, and culture. The church was led by the pope in Rome, who was considered the highest authority on earth. Below him were bishops, who were in charge of large areas called dioceses. Below them were priests, who were in charge of smaller areas called parishes.


The Normans built many churches and monasteries across England. They also introduced a new style of architecture called Romanesque or Norman style, which featured round arches, thick walls, small windows, vaulted ceilings, and decorated carvings. Some examples of Norman churches are Canterbury Cathedral, Durham Cathedral, Ely Cathedral, Peterborough Cathedral, and Winchester Cathedral.


How did the Normans change England?




The Normans changed England in many ways, both positive and negative. They introduced new ideas, institutions, and innovations that shaped the country's history, culture, and identity. They also caused a lot of suffering, violence, and oppression for the native people of England.


Language and literature




The Normans had a significant impact on the development of the English language and literature. As we mentioned before, they brought many words from French into English, especially in areas like government, law, religion, food, fashion, and culture. They also influenced the spelling and pronunciation of some English words. For example, they changed the Old English letter "þ" (thorn), which sounded like "th", to "y", which looked more like their own letter "y". That's why we sometimes see words like "ye" instead of "the" in old texts.


The Normans also changed the way people wrote and read in England. Before the Norman conquest, most people wrote and read in Old English, which was a Germanic language with complex grammar and vocabulary. After the Norman conquest, most people wrote and read in Latin or French, which were Romance languages with simpler grammar and vocabulary. Latin was used for official documents, laws, records, and learning. French was used for courtly literature, poetry, and romance. English was mostly spoken by the lower classes and was considered a vulgar language.


However, English did not disappear completely. It gradually evolved into Middle English, which was a mixture of Old English, French, Latin, and other languages. Middle English became more popular and widespread in the 14th century, thanks to writers like Geoffrey Chaucer, who wrote The Canterbury Tales in Middle English. Middle English eventually developed into Modern English, which is the language we speak today.


Law and government




The Normans also had a significant impact on the law and government of England. They established a centralized and efficient system of administration that replaced the fragmented and chaotic system of the Anglo-Saxons. They divided the country into counties (shires), which were further divided into hundreds (districts) and manors (estates). They appointed sheriffs (officials) to collect taxes, enforce laws, and maintain order in each county. They also created courts (tribunals) to settle disputes and punish crimes.


The Normans also introduced a new concept of law called common law, which was based on customs, precedents, and judgments rather than written codes or statutes. Common law applied to everyone in the country regardless of their status or origin. It was administered by royal judges who traveled around the country to hear cases and make decisions. Common law became the basis of the legal system in England and many other countries.


The Normans also introduced a new institution called parliament, which was a council of nobles and clergy who advised the king on important matters. Parliament had some power to check and limit the king's authority, especially on issues like taxation and war. Parliament also represented the interests and grievances of the people to some extent. Parliament evolved into a bicameral (two-chamber) legislature that consisted of the House of Lords (nobles and clergy) and the House of Commons (knights and burgesses).


Architecture and art




The Normans also had a significant impact on the architecture and art of England. They built many impressive structures that reflected their style, skill, and ambition. They also created many beautiful works that expressed their culture, faith, and creativity.


vaulted ceilings, and decorated carvings. Some examples of Norman churches are Canterbury Cathedral, Durham Cathedral, Ely Cathedral, Peterborough Cathedral, and Winchester Cathedral.


The Normans also created many works of art that reflected their culture and history. They used various materials and techniques, such as stone, wood, metal, glass, mosaic, embroidery, and painting. They made sculptures, statues, crosses, reliquaries, altars, fonts, tombs, windows, frescoes, manuscripts, and tapestries. One of the most famous works of art from Norman times is the Bayeux Tapestry, which is a long piece of embroidered cloth that tells the story of the Norman conquest of England.


How can you learn more about the Normans?




The Normans were a fascinating and influential group of people who left a lasting mark on England and the world. If you want to learn more about them and their legacy, there are many ways you can do so. Here are some suggestions:


Online resources and websites




One of the easiest and most convenient ways to learn more about the Normans is to use online resources and websites. There are many websites that provide information, images, videos, games, quizzes, and activities about the Normans and their history. Some examples are:


  • BBC Bitesize: The Normans: This website offers a series of short videos and articles that cover the main aspects of the Norman conquest and its impact on England.



  • History for Kids: The Normans: This website offers a simple and fun introduction to the Normans and their culture for children. It includes facts, pictures, maps, timelines, games, and worksheets.



  • The National Archives: The Normans: This website offers a collection of primary sources and documents related to the Normans and their rule in England. It includes records of the Domesday Book, the Magna Carta, the Pipe Rolls, and more.



Books and documentaries




Another way to learn more about the Normans is to read books or watch documentaries that explore their history and culture in depth. There are many books and documentaries that cover different aspects of the Normans and their legacy. Some examples are:


  • The Normans in English History 1066-1154 by Frank Barlow: This book is a comprehensive and authoritative account of the Norman conquest and its aftermath in England. It covers the political, social, economic, religious, and cultural changes that the Normans brought to England.



  • The Norman Conquest: The Battle of Hastings and the Fall of Anglo-Saxon England by Marc Morris: This book is a vivid and engaging narrative of the events and personalities that led to the Norman conquest of England. It focuses on the dramatic story of the Battle of Hastings and its consequences for both sides.



equipment, tactics, and campaigns of the Normans. It covers their origins as Vikings, their conquests in France, England, Italy, and the Middle East, and their legacy as warriors and rulers.


  • The Normans (2010): This is a three-part documentary series by the BBC that explores the history and impact of the Normans. It is presented by historian Robert Bartlett, who travels to various loca