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Mason Campbell
Mason Campbell

Refuge Recovery: A Buddhist Path To Recovery Fr... BETTER


Both the Refuge Board and Noah continue to believe that other aspects of the Refuge Recovery program outlined in the book, such as mentorship, inventories, guided meditations, reliance on the fundamentals of Buddhism, including the Four Noble Truths and the Eightfold Path, and a structured approach to meetings, should be maintained. Sanghas wishing to remain in Refuge Recovery will be supported by RRWS. Those wishing an alternative may choose to affiliate with RDC. Both organizations will support those wishing to pursue a recovery based on Buddhist principles and practices. All parties to the litigation are fully aware of the suffering that has resulted from this dispute, and that there is a great shared responsibility to help heal the divisions. In an effort to end the suffering that has resulted from this dispute, and to focus on providing support for those who wish to pursue a path to recovery using Buddhist practices and principles, all of the parties to the lawsuit have agreed to withdraw their legal claims and move forward.




Refuge Recovery: A Buddhist Path to Recovery Fr...


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The ideas and practices behind a Buddhist-based recovery program and movement are not ending. Everyone in our community is free to choose their own path. It is the hope of all parties that in ending this litigation, the community can continue to benefit from engaging in a practice based in understanding, compassion, metta, and equanimity.


Buddhism as a discipline may appeal to addicted persons seeking a way of life for after recovery because it is a very accepting philosophy. Many controversial issues for which very rigid restrictions are in line in other disciplines are open to interpretation in Buddhism (such as the subjects of abortion, contraception, and modesty). In other words, the Buddhist way can provide an accepting discipline which promotes choice and spiritual growth while guiding participants in the path of mindfulness.


Noah Levine has been using Buddhist practices to recover from addiction since 1998. He is the founding teacher of Against the Stream Meditation Society. Visit the author online at www.refugerecovery.org and www.againstthestream.org.


"Refuge Recovery is a practice, a process, a set of tools, a treatment, and a path to healing addiction and the suffering caused by addiction," Levine writes in the introduction. Because Buddhism offers a nontheistic approach to problems, there is no pressure put on addicts to believe anything, only to trust the process and do the hard work of recovery.


According to Levine, addiction creates suffering in the addict and those who are close to him/her. Although the cause is repetitive craving, there is a path to recovery through the Fourth Noble Truth and the Eightfold Path. The intention to renounce greed, hatred, and delusion is an intention that can animate addicts to "practice honesty, humility and live with integrity."


Bestselling author and renowned Buddhist teacher Noah Levine adapts the Buddha's Four Noble Truths and Eight Fold Path into a proven and systematic approach to recovery from alcohol and drug addiction--an indispensable alternative to the 12-step program. While many desperately need the help of the 12-step recovery program, the traditional AA model's focus on an external higher power can alienate people who don't connect with its religious tenets. Refuge Recovery is a systematic method based on Buddhist principles, which integrates scientific, non-theistic, and psychological insight. Viewing addiction as cravings in the mind and body, Levine shows how a path of meditative awareness can alleviate those desires and ease suffering. Refuge Recovery includes daily meditation practices, written investigations that explore the causes and conditions of our addictions, and advice and inspiration for finding or creating a community to help you heal and awaken. Practical yet compassionate, Levine's successful Refuge Recovery system is designed for anyone interested in a non-theistic approach to recovery and requires no previous experience or knowledge of Buddhism or meditation.


Communication: We take refuge in the community as a place to practice wise and skillful communication and to support others on their path. We practice being honest, wise and careful with our communications, asking for help from the community, allowing others to guide us through the process. Practicing openness, honesty and humility about the difficulties and successes we experience.


Refuge Recovery is an abstinence-based program. It is peer-led, meaning that no one is a Buddhist teacher or official authority; like the 12-Step fellowships, authority rests in the group. In many ways, the structure resembles that of 12-Step recovery, in that each group is independent and leadership is rotating. However, the Refuge Recovery program takes a non-theistic approach, and no one is required to find or believe in a Higher Power. The power to recover is said to rest within each individual, given that he or she is willing to do the work of following the path of recovery.


This recovery approach promotes the idea that recovery begins with abstinence, and that the path to sobriety is not linear but made up of factors that the individual in recovery will need to understand and apply concurrently on the path to spiritual awakening. Examples of these factors include intention, communication, service, action, and mindfulness.


Whether this path is familiar to you, or new to you, we all benefit from the support of a community of peers who share this journey. For that reason, Refuge Recovery seeks to support those on this path by building an extensive and comprehensive network of Refuge Recovery meetings and communities that practice, educate, and provide Buddhist-inspired guidance and meditations for anyone seeking recovery from addiction.


Refuge Recovery is a non-profit organization grounded in the belief that Buddhist principles and practices create a strong foundation for the addiction recovery process. Wisdom and compassion enable those struggling with any form of addiction to become more mindful of their mental processes while also developing a deep understanding of the suffering that addiction has created and compassion for their own pain. The mission of Refuge Recovery is to support those on this path of recovery by building an extensive and comprehensive network of Refuge Recovery groups, meetings and communities that practice, educate and provide Buddhist-inspired guidance and meditations for anyone seeking recovery from addiction. We hope to serve you, and meet you on the path.


As a peer-led recovery program using Buddhism as the path to freedom from all addictions, Refuge Recovery is a community that embraces all people regardless of age, race, class, culture, nationality, ethnic origin, religious/spiritual background, gender, gender identity, sexual/affectional orientation, marital status, family structure, social identity, physical ability or appearance, mental health, legal standing, and educational or socioeconomic status. As such, we strive to speak to each other in a compassionate way using wise communication and avoiding hate-speech, intimidation, and violence of any kind. If you seek refuge in our community, we hope you feel welcome and safe.


Refuge Recovery is a non-profit organization grounded in the belief that Buddhist principles and practices create a strong foundation for a path to freedom from addiction. This is an approach to recovery that understands: All individuals have the power and potential to free themselves from the suffering that is caused by addiction. We feel confident in the power of the Dharma, if applied, to relieve suffering of all kinds, including the suffering of addiction. This is a process that cultivates a path of awakening, the path of recovering from the addictions and delusions that have created so much suffering in our lives and in this world.


Refuge Recovery believes that training our hearts and minds to see clearly and respond to our lives with understanding and non-harming can free us from addiction. In the beginning, some of these practices may seem confusing or counter-instinctual, and indeed some of them are, but we believe they provide a clear path to freedom. Whether this path is familiar to you or new to you, we all benefit from the support of a community of peers who share this journey. For that reason, Refuge Recovery seeks to support those on this path by building an extensive and comprehensive network of Refuge Recovery meetings and communities that practice, educate, and provide Buddhist-inspired guidance and meditations for anyone seeking recovery from addiction.


While this recovery program is Buddhist-oriented, it is non-theistic. In other words, it does not ask those who choose to follow this path to adhere to any particular belief system. Rather, it simply asks that they trust the process, and be willing to put in the work to overcome their dependency.


Refuge Recovery: Is a mindfulness-based addiction recovery community that practices and utilizes Buddhist philosophy as the foundation of the recovery process. Drawing inspiration from the core teachings of the Four Noble Truths, emphasis is placed on both knowledge and empathy as a means for overcoming addiction and its causes. Those struggling with any form of addiction greatly benefit when they are able to understand the suffering that addiction has created while developing compassion for the pain they have experienced. We hope to serve you, and meet you on the path.


Of course, like every path, you can only get to your destination by moving forward, one foot in front of the other. The path is gradual and comprehensive, a map of the inner terrain that must be traversed in the process of recovery. The path includes daily meditation practices, written investigations of the causes and conditions of your addictions, and how to find or create the community you will need in order to heal and awaken. We have also included stories of people who have successfully recovered with the help of Buddhist practices. 041b061a72


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